Sunday, January 13, 2019

REX KENNEDY ROSSER, Baseball Card Collector

The Collector sent a round of cards a few months ago. One in particular left me with many mixed emotions.  These were cards right off my want list. We all appreciate others who take time to go over our lists then thumb through their collections to helps us out. It takes time. Time is precious and all too often, fleeting.

94 Stadium Club - WAGING WAR on Steve Buechele

Chris included catchers, Tigers and Cobb for my PC:


All were welcomed additions. My favorites by far however, were the Oklahoma City 89ers he included. I'd just added  89ers to the list of wants. I'll always be an Okie; one quite proud of her home state and Native American heritage. This connection to my baseball collection is perfect.

These are the cards Chris sent. All are from the initial year of 89er cardboard.

1975 Oklahoma 89ers Team Issue

It's fun to look up old minor-leaguers to see what became of their lives but the card that most intrigued me was that of the young Rex Rosser, Baseball Card Collector. Eight months older than me, Rex had something I didn't - a baseball card collection.  Here's the backside:


Totally cool! This pre-teen had some apparent influence.  While he likely never made the majors, Rex must've done something baseball related, at least that's what I'd hoped to find. What I found though, was unexpected.  Just a short few years later, Rex was gone.

An empty seat at the dinner table, an empty bedroom. A grieving family who lost their young son in a car accident. A father who may have struggled with guilt for some time, for something likely out of his control.  Teammates losing one of their own. My heart ached instantly for the friends and family of a young man gone almost 40 years now. 




Find-A-Grave

Time does heal if we allow. Rex is surely remembered with love and a special fondness by all who knew him. His enthusiasm for life shines through on his only known baseball card. The next time I'm in OKC, a visit to Rose Hill will be in my plans. It's a big cemetery but I'm certain the search will be worthwhile. I'll have a seat there and tell him what his card means to me; how his 89ers are now Dodgers and thank him. At this moment, I have a greater appreciation for my own youth, and life in general. I have something he didn't...the past 40 years.


22 comments:

  1. That's sad, I mean, I'm only 12 and I hope that I'll live longer then that.
    https://adventuresofabaseballcardcollector.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. On Blogger since 2007? hmmm. You're off to a great start! Live long and Prosper!

      Delete
  2. Wow. That’s a very interesting, sad story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. thanks for reading, AJ. It wasn't the story I hoped for.

      Delete
  3. I got this set from a card shop I used to work for back in 1981. Little did I know, Rex had already passed when I received his card. I was only 11 at the time. Thanks for researching this and sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. card shops in 1981? this would be an interesting topic to share on the blogs! You should totally do that! Thanks for reading. I don't generally share sad stories here but this one I found quite moving.

      Delete
  4. Great post. Interesting card. Sad story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Fuji. Sometimes it's ok to share a story like this. Back to happy stuff next time!

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. Hey 75! thanks for reading. It's something I've wanted to share for awhile now.

      Delete
  6. Wow, sad story. His family must have been living in mental torment all these years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mr. Rosser passed in 2005. From all I can tell, the family was quite philanthropic, active in church and volunteer work. Good people. It must've been a difficult situation to move past. Losing a child is a pain I'll never know.

      Delete
  7. Poor little fella. It's nice that his memory can live on through his card.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think this will be the first card in my Oklahoma binder. He is now a special part of my collection. Perhaps his family will stumble across this post one day. They can know their loved one is not forgotten.

      Delete
  8. Man, the story behind that card sure took a somber turn. If nothing else, it's fantastic that little Rex received a baseball card, which is more than most of us will be able to say once we're gone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rex did have a chance to enjoy that moment in life. No doubt a big deal for him. He probably packed a lot into such a short time, leaving his family with good and fond memories.

      Delete
  9. I'm glad I was able to send these to you, not just because they fit your collection but because I would not have thought to research Rex and learn of his premature passing. It's a very sad story indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks again Chris. This one will always be special to me. I love my Okie connection to cards. I'm quite familiar with the cemetery too so will plan a visit the next time I'm there.

      Delete
  10. An interesting and sad story for sure. Interesting that he made the first 89er cards. Very accomplished!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. S&M Man! Welcome! It's a shame he didn't live to see minor league cards take off as they have. Rex played a big role there. I wonder if his family realizes this at all.

      Delete
  11. Really interesting story. As a Minor League baseball fan and card collector, I love doing a little research when I get new cards to see where players have landed. Found many interesting stories over the years, but nothing as sad as this story. I am sure that this card is a great memory for his family.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. SB - in this internet age, I hope his family comes across this post. Our community understands the young Rex Rosser and his love for collecting baseball heroes. I can't help but feel he made a special contribution, way back in 1975. What would he think now?

      Delete